Scotland stands in Solidarity with Refugees

Impressions from “Glasgow sees Syria” on 12th September 2015

 

Arson, displacement and unemployment: Life after asylum in Germany

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It is almost impossible to legally ask for asylum in Germany. In order to do so the country from which a person enters Germany must itself be carrying out persecution. This does not apply to any of the countries that border Germany, so the only way to legally ask for asylum is to enter the country by sea or air.

According to the Dublin Convention, Germany can send any asylum seeker back to their country if the government is able to prove where they come from. If this cannot be done, the asylum seeker can still only apply for limited protection.

After having applied, the asylum seekers are dispersed across the Bundesländer (the German federal states) and must stay in the accommodation they are given until a decision is made about their request. This process can go on for more than a year, especially for those from countries such as Pakistan and Afghanistan. If asylum cannot be granted, they may still be granted protection as refugees. A refugee is a person who “is temporarily out of their native country because of fear of persecution due to their religion, nationality, political view or social conditions” and “whose human rights have been or might be violated”.

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Calais crisis – dehumanisation, detention centres and abuse

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Written by Jade Jackman

David Cameron, our charming Prime Minister, sees a swarm on the British horizon. In a publicly broadcasted statement, he described migrants in Calais in such a casually dehumanising tone that even Nigel Farage felt comfortable to feign shock.

However, this new public outcry is not necessarily helpful and is, at best, wilfully naive. Calais has become a spectacle. Online news sources keep pumping images of ‘extraordinary scenes’ of the ‘migrant madness’. For the main part, the photographs are nothing new and the captions, especially from the Telegraph, are more stock than the images themselves. For example, they remind the viewer that the police ‘were forced’ to intervene and focus on the violence of the migrants towards each-other. Not only does this feed into the trope of feral other, it reinforces the notion that black bodies must be controlled by white order.

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