Arson, displacement and unemployment: Life after asylum in Germany

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It is almost impossible to legally ask for asylum in Germany. In order to do so the country from which a person enters Germany must itself be carrying out persecution. This does not apply to any of the countries that border Germany, so the only way to legally ask for asylum is to enter the country by sea or air.

According to the Dublin Convention, Germany can send any asylum seeker back to their country if the government is able to prove where they come from. If this cannot be done, the asylum seeker can still only apply for limited protection.

After having applied, the asylum seekers are dispersed across the Bundesländer (the German federal states) and must stay in the accommodation they are given until a decision is made about their request. This process can go on for more than a year, especially for those from countries such as Pakistan and Afghanistan. If asylum cannot be granted, they may still be granted protection as refugees. A refugee is a person who “is temporarily out of their native country because of fear of persecution due to their religion, nationality, political view or social conditions” and “whose human rights have been or might be violated”.

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Calais crisis – dehumanisation, detention centres and abuse

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Written by Jade Jackman

David Cameron, our charming Prime Minister, sees a swarm on the British horizon. In a publicly broadcasted statement, he described migrants in Calais in such a casually dehumanising tone that even Nigel Farage felt comfortable to feign shock.

However, this new public outcry is not necessarily helpful and is, at best, wilfully naive. Calais has become a spectacle. Online news sources keep pumping images of ‘extraordinary scenes’ of the ‘migrant madness’. For the main part, the photographs are nothing new and the captions, especially from the Telegraph, are more stock than the images themselves. For example, they remind the viewer that the police ‘were forced’ to intervene and focus on the violence of the migrants towards each-other. Not only does this feed into the trope of feral other, it reinforces the notion that black bodies must be controlled by white order.

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Romania: Conference on Roma Rights

 SO KERES, EUROPA? – What’s up Europe?

“In Europe, a lot of young Roma need to fight against stereotypes and discrimination every day. It is time for us to claim our space and build a movement of Roma in Europe!”, says Alexandra Bahor, a young Romni from Romania. 

  

Around 300 young Roma and Non-Roma youth activists and youth leaders from more than 15 European countries are expected to brought together for a multifaceted program, including workshops, interactions with the local communities and a public event in Cluj-Napoca. The city was selected to hold the title of the European Youth Capital 2015 – A considerable occasion to raise the voice of Roma youth on a European level!

Cluj-Napoca stands in the centre of our event for a very specific reason: On 17 December 2010, 76 families were forcibly evicted without adequate notice by local authorities from Coastei Street in the centre of the city of Cluj-Napoca. No consultation with the affected families took place prior to the eviction and no feasible alternatives to the eviction were explored. Forty of these families were relocated to inadequate housing conditions on the outskirts of the city (in Pata Rat), close to the city’s garbage dump and a former chemical waste dump, while the remaining families were left without alternative housing. We want to share the interests of the communities and show solidarity!

The idea is to offer a platform to young people to express themselves, their knowledge and ideas. Not only topics such as the Holocaust and especially Transnistria will stand in the centre of attention but also questions around Europe, identity and discrimination. The arts will not lose out either: Singing and dance workshops as well as street music and graffiti are part of the activities. The knowledge and discussions will find their expression through 48-hour-actions and the initiative and the engagement of the Changemakers. In Cluj, the participants create their own projects and will find the space to raise awareness for curical issues and a topics. During the event-week fun and relaxation will not come too short: Open discussions, jam sessions and

The initiators of the event are Phiren Amenca, a Roma organisation based in Budapest and the Platform of Former Volunteers. The latter is a new project by Phiren Amenca for former and current volunteers of the organisation who want to actively engage and exchange experience and knowledge after or during a voluntary service. The Platform is an open space for the development of projects and exchange that are initiated by its members.

For   any   further   information   please   visit   our   homepage    www.sokeres.eu,   facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/So-keres-Europa-Changemakers-Movement/757536637694223? Email: ereseuropa.mediateam@gmail.com

Source: http://www.sokeres.eu/