Glasgow stands up for Saudi blogger – Raif Badawi

Press Release for Immediate Use

The Glasgow based human rights organisation Global Minorities Alliance (GMA) has called on the Scottish Government for immediate intervention for the release of the imprisoned Saudi blogger, Raif Badawi.  
 
Mr Badawi has become an icon for the human right to freedom of expression after being imprisoned for posting his views on Islam on the website “Free Saudi Liberals”. The 31-year-old blogger was sentenced by Saudi authorities in May 2014 to 1,000 lashes, 10 years in prison and a major fine. Last week Mr Badawi was awarded with first Deutsche Welle Freedom of Speech award, among host of other awards conferred upon him from the world over.
 
A vigil in support of Mr Badawi’s release was held by local human rights activists which was also attended by  Anne McLaughlin MP, members Global Minorities Alliance, Amnesty International, the Scottish Secular Society as well as members of the wider public in Glasgow’s busy Buchanan Street at noon time on July 4 2015.
Vigil attendees call for release of Raif Badawi

Vigil attendees call for release of Raif Badawi

 
Anne McLaughlin, MP for Glasgow North East and SNP Spokesperson in Westminster for Civil Liberties supported  the vigil and termed Mr Badawi’s lashing as ‘torture’ since thousand lashes are to be carried out in 20 sets of 50 lashes to let wounds heal in between. She further expressed her concern over the lack of pressure towards the Saudi treatment of Mr Badawi and his supporters.
 
Global Minorities Alliance urged both International and local human rights organisations, activists and civil society to force a more robust response and to increase Saudi Government not only to halt the lashing but to release Mr Raif Badawi.
 
Encouraging the attendees of the vigil to uphold any effort to free Mr Badawi, Global Minorities Alliance vice-chairperson Shahid Khan said: 
 
“We believe that every human being has a fundamental right to express their opinion which is also enshrined in the United Nations Article 18. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion’ and stressed that Saudia Arabai being a key member of United Nations must honour its UN treaties.”
 
“We as GMA defend the right of all persecuted and oppressed communities around the world and stand in solidarity with Raif Badawi and his family and all those voices around the world who have been advocating the freedom of Raif which has been denied to him because of his liberal views on Islam and call for his immediate release’
 
“Our thoughts are with Mr Badawi’s family that is facing this challenge with a hope in hearts and we continue to support Mr Badawi’s courageous wife, Ensaf Haider and her children at this difficult times of their lives”, said Mr Khan. 
 
Elham Manea, associate Professor of Political Science at Zurich University and an ardent supporter of Raif Badawi, said in a message to Global Minorities Alliance ahead of the vigil: 
 
“Raif Badawi is a symbol – a symbol for the right to freedoms of opinion and expression. The vigil sends a message to the world that these freedoms are not and should not be circumcised in the name of culture and religion. They are universal. Men and women are paying a high price all over the world in their own countries to guarantee these rights. The vigil sends out the message that these fights concern us all.”

 

 
The highlights of the vigil can been found on Global Minorities Alliance Facebook Page here https://goo.gl/Pon01d
Ends

Tackling militant Islamism means also confronting its non-violent forms

Sept 11

By Elham Manea

#Islamism #Extremism #HopeNotHate #Radicalisation #GMABlog

The call is often from a worried teacher. They are noticing changes in students from immigrant backgrounds. Before, they defined themselves by nationality, as Kosovars, Bosnians or Turks, now they say they are Muslims. Before, they took part in art classes, now they insist their religion prohibits art. Then there’s a second change: these young men and women start to talk of a war against Islam that targets Muslims – targets them.

When I listen, I remember myself as a 16-year-old, the daughter of a diplomat from a secular family, coming back to my home country, Yemen, after four years in Morocco. It was 1982 – a period that saw the mushrooming of Islamist ideology in North Yemen. I was fascinated by a religious group led by a charismatic young woman of 17. The group met in the schoolyard. I would later learn it was part of a strong Islamist movement that saw Salafists work hand-in-hand with the Muslim Brotherhood.

The sessions were fascinating. Our leader explained about the love of God. The moment we enter into Islam, she said, all our sins are washed away and we become equal. The fate of those who are not Muslims was never mentioned. She told us that we could be better people if only we embraced the message of Islam – the true Islam, not the corrupted form of our society. For a teenage girl, lacking direction, the message was mesmerising, and I embraced it wholeheartedly.

The changes in me were gradual. It started with language. Instead of greeting others with ‘good morning’ or ‘good evening’, I used only the salute of Islam: ‘assalamu alaikum’, peace be upon you. Later I would learn that this salute is only reserved for Muslims. “Do not use it with non-Muslims,” I was told.

Continue reading

The foolish fear of Islamization? – Germany and the PEGIDA movement

PEGIDA

By Rebecca Gebauer

#multiculturalism #Islam #Germany #PEGIDA

Watching the recent wave of anti-Islamic demonstrations by a group called PEGIDA (Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the Occident) in Dresden, Germany, I cannot help but wonder how it can be that up to 17,500 people feel motivated to protest against the ‘Islamization of Europe’. One should think that Germany, being the country with the worst history of fascism, racism and deadly persecution, should know better than that.

Continue reading