Update: #Books4Future – Kenya

Kids Photo

 

Global Minorities Alliance believes education is the key to fight injustices, inequalities and societal prejudices in the world.  This year we launched our education campaign to help the slum children, in one of the largest urban slums in the world – Kibera slums in Nairobi, Kenya.

As previously informed to our readers through our posts, we would like to help this local primary school, Star of the Land Education Centre, which is run by a community women’s group. The school is deprived of  most basic needs a school might have and struggles to obtain teaching materials. We would like to support the school in developing a library with primary school books, tables, chairs, a computer and a printer.

Global Minorities Alliance would like to thank all those who have been supporting this project. With your donations we have raised £1,034 to date and we continue to ask for more help to reach our target of £5000. Our campaign will end this August.

Our delegates Shahid Khan and Rebecca Gebauer recently met with representatives of an excellent charity in Scotland which donates books in the most deprived areas in the world with books, Books Abroad which will help us ship whopping 2500 books in August/September this year for our school in Kibera slums.  We are thrilled for this happy news and thank Books Abroad  for their excellent work and for our future collaboration with them.

 

If you would like to raise funds to support us in this campaign then please do contact us or drop an email at info@globalminorities.co.uk  or if you would like to donate then simply  click on our fundraising page. We are deeply thankful for your support.

#Books4Future – Help building a library in Kenya: https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/f15lm9/ab/54brp6

GMA’s Charity Appeal Video: https://www.facebook.com/411533358921035/videos/963299467077752/

 

Mchanganyiko CBO school, Kibera – What Next?

Education in Kenya – a Millennium Development Goal

The second millennium development goal in Kenya is to achieve free universal primary education by 2015. As of now, Kenya is still struggling to educate its children especially in informal settlements where children attend poorly regulated informal schools raising prospects of poorly equipped workforce in the future. According to Kenya Open-data, a government information portal, at least 3 million Nairobi residents live in slums.

The Kenyan government supports only 8% of the schools in Kibera. For other schools to thrive, parents must pay some fees for paying teachers and labourers and buying stationery. These locally run schools have no government teachers posted there hence rely on untrained teachers who are underpaid and less motivated.

Every child deserves an education. But in Kibera, a slum where many families live on one or two dollars a day, school is an impossible luxury. Students, particularly female students, that cannot afford fees are forced to leave school and work, or in some cases marry at a very young age. They have to do household chores and help with selling groceries, fetching water, washing clothes and general cleaning, through which they only earn a meagre income.

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