Mchanganyiko CBO school, Kibera – What Next?

Education in Kenya – a Millennium Development Goal

The second millennium development goal in Kenya is to achieve free universal primary education by 2015. As of now, Kenya is still struggling to educate its children especially in informal settlements where children attend poorly regulated informal schools raising prospects of poorly equipped workforce in the future. According to Kenya Open-data, a government information portal, at least 3 million Nairobi residents live in slums.

The Kenyan government supports only 8% of the schools in Kibera. For other schools to thrive, parents must pay some fees for paying teachers and labourers and buying stationery. These locally run schools have no government teachers posted there hence rely on untrained teachers who are underpaid and less motivated.

Every child deserves an education. But in Kibera, a slum where many families live on one or two dollars a day, school is an impossible luxury. Students, particularly female students, that cannot afford fees are forced to leave school and work, or in some cases marry at a very young age. They have to do household chores and help with selling groceries, fetching water, washing clothes and general cleaning, through which they only earn a meagre income.

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Romania: Conference on Roma Rights

 SO KERES, EUROPA? – What’s up Europe?

“In Europe, a lot of young Roma need to fight against stereotypes and discrimination every day. It is time for us to claim our space and build a movement of Roma in Europe!”, says Alexandra Bahor, a young Romni from Romania. 

  

Around 300 young Roma and Non-Roma youth activists and youth leaders from more than 15 European countries are expected to brought together for a multifaceted program, including workshops, interactions with the local communities and a public event in Cluj-Napoca. The city was selected to hold the title of the European Youth Capital 2015 – A considerable occasion to raise the voice of Roma youth on a European level!

Cluj-Napoca stands in the centre of our event for a very specific reason: On 17 December 2010, 76 families were forcibly evicted without adequate notice by local authorities from Coastei Street in the centre of the city of Cluj-Napoca. No consultation with the affected families took place prior to the eviction and no feasible alternatives to the eviction were explored. Forty of these families were relocated to inadequate housing conditions on the outskirts of the city (in Pata Rat), close to the city’s garbage dump and a former chemical waste dump, while the remaining families were left without alternative housing. We want to share the interests of the communities and show solidarity!

The idea is to offer a platform to young people to express themselves, their knowledge and ideas. Not only topics such as the Holocaust and especially Transnistria will stand in the centre of attention but also questions around Europe, identity and discrimination. The arts will not lose out either: Singing and dance workshops as well as street music and graffiti are part of the activities. The knowledge and discussions will find their expression through 48-hour-actions and the initiative and the engagement of the Changemakers. In Cluj, the participants create their own projects and will find the space to raise awareness for curical issues and a topics. During the event-week fun and relaxation will not come too short: Open discussions, jam sessions and

The initiators of the event are Phiren Amenca, a Roma organisation based in Budapest and the Platform of Former Volunteers. The latter is a new project by Phiren Amenca for former and current volunteers of the organisation who want to actively engage and exchange experience and knowledge after or during a voluntary service. The Platform is an open space for the development of projects and exchange that are initiated by its members.

For   any   further   information   please   visit   our   homepage    www.sokeres.eu,   facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/So-keres-Europa-Changemakers-Movement/757536637694223? Email: ereseuropa.mediateam@gmail.com

Source: http://www.sokeres.eu/

Tackling militant Islamism means also confronting its non-violent forms

Sept 11

By Elham Manea

#Islamism #Extremism #HopeNotHate #Radicalisation #GMABlog

The call is often from a worried teacher. They are noticing changes in students from immigrant backgrounds. Before, they defined themselves by nationality, as Kosovars, Bosnians or Turks, now they say they are Muslims. Before, they took part in art classes, now they insist their religion prohibits art. Then there’s a second change: these young men and women start to talk of a war against Islam that targets Muslims – targets them.

When I listen, I remember myself as a 16-year-old, the daughter of a diplomat from a secular family, coming back to my home country, Yemen, after four years in Morocco. It was 1982 – a period that saw the mushrooming of Islamist ideology in North Yemen. I was fascinated by a religious group led by a charismatic young woman of 17. The group met in the schoolyard. I would later learn it was part of a strong Islamist movement that saw Salafists work hand-in-hand with the Muslim Brotherhood.

The sessions were fascinating. Our leader explained about the love of God. The moment we enter into Islam, she said, all our sins are washed away and we become equal. The fate of those who are not Muslims was never mentioned. She told us that we could be better people if only we embraced the message of Islam – the true Islam, not the corrupted form of our society. For a teenage girl, lacking direction, the message was mesmerising, and I embraced it wholeheartedly.

The changes in me were gradual. It started with language. Instead of greeting others with ‘good morning’ or ‘good evening’, I used only the salute of Islam: ‘assalamu alaikum’, peace be upon you. Later I would learn that this salute is only reserved for Muslims. “Do not use it with non-Muslims,” I was told.

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