Educational inequality: a problem for Pakistan

7295675962_7477884066_z

By Cleora Broens

#Pakistan #genderinequality #education #GMABlog

Pakistan’s educational system faces a lot of problems related to admission, calibre and equal opportunities at all levels, from primary and secondary schools to higher education to professional education. Even though there have been positive movements taking place, such as the fast spread of private schooling and the increase of higher educational opportunities, organised restoration of a working education system is still tenaciously incomprehensible. This inefficiency of governments to restore the system has had a terrible effect on Pakistan’s economic societal environments.

Continue reading

The rise of anti-Semitism in the UK

antisemitism

By Jack Telford

#GMABlog #antisemitism #Judaism #UK

The recent murder of four innocent people in a Jewish supermarket in Paris has brought an unwanted reality into the public eye once again; the rise of anti-Semitism. Attacks across Europe on the Jewish community – such as the shooting of four people in a Jewish museum in Brussels last year and the 2012 murder of the same number in Toulouse – have brought fear and uncertainty to the minority group.

Whilst many believe that this discrimination is cut off from Britain, recent figures suggest that anti-Semitic behaviour is on the rise in the UK, with July 2014 marking the nation’s highest ever recorded levels of anti-Semitism.

Continue reading

Girls are made perfect – Say No! to FGM

“I feel that God made my body perfect the way I was born. Then man robbed me, took away my power, and left me a cripple. My womanhood was stolen. If God had wanted those body parts missing, why did he create them?”  Waris Dirie

Friday 6th February 2015 marked the 12th International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM. 140 million women and girls worldwide underwent brutal practice of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); another 3 million are at risk yearly to face the excruciating pain of their genitalia being removed partially or even completely for no medical reason but to obey tradition and social pressures.

The archaic practice to prevent girls from “being ill-mannered and doing bad things, and being badly behaved”, is carried out in 29 countries which are primarily concentrated in Africa and the Middle East. In violation of human rights of women and girls the procedure is generally carried between infancy and age 15.

One quarter of all FGM worldwide is carried out in Egypt; 91% of all married women there have been mutilated and that despite the fact that the practice had been made illegal in 2008. Even though the practice includes many risks including cysts, infections, infertility as well as complications in childbirth and increased risk of newborn deaths, it has persisted for over a thousand years. Continue reading